The Mythical Town of East Tincup, Colorado

Postcard of sign at East Tincup theme park in Golden, Colorado
Postcard from East Tincup theme park in Golden, Colorado

Pete Smythe was a local Denver radio personality in the 1950s that many of us still remember fondly. His program originated from a mythical store called Pete Smythe's General Store from the mythical town of East Tincup, Colorado. He had a musical opening that was very familiar at the time, but something that I can't now remember. It was all about opening up the store and "now we're ready for business," etc.

He had an old player piano that we heard occasionally and plenty of folksy chatter. Several years after it gained popularity, a small commercial development sprang up in the foothills with the name Tincup. I don't know if it was connected with the program, but I don't think it survived too long.

Joe Flood was another local radio personality who I enjoyed. He had a program called The Upsy Daisy Show. During the course of the show, he would bang on the pots and pans and make up all sorts of noise so his listeners would get out of bed and get going. He also had an evening program that played some unusual records. I think they were classified as novelty tunes. At any rate, I loved them at the time.

Chuck Collins, the father of singer Judy Collins, used to play the piano and sing on a local radio program. Our school class went to see him perform in the radio studio once and then he visited our school and performed in the auditorium. He was blind and was a great example of how a person can overcome a handicap. His motto was, "Every stumbling block can become a stepping stone."

The last person I remember was Don Roberts. He had a morning show which always started with the Star-Spangled Banner and the Pledge of Allegiance.

There are still plenty of local shows, but I miss the down-home quality and folksy charm of the old programs of my youth.

Lon McCartt in Return With Us Now, January 1999

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